Book Review by Chello Cordero

See here: https://ccepotourri.wordpress.com/2020/08/04/book-review-moneyball-medicine/

MoneyBall Medicine: Thriving in the New Data-Driven Healthcare Market

by Harry Glorikian

Embracing the Future of Healthcare

With over 300-million people in the U.S.A. and almost 8-billion people worldwide, even people with very rare diseases and conditions are not alone. And with that many people around every doctor should be able to rely on the research and treatments of other professionals. As far as I am concerned, this was the most important aspect of the book MoneyBall MEDICINE by Harry Glorikian and Malorye Allison Branca.

Building a database of symptoms and treatments would allow doctors to treat conditions even if they have never dealt with such patients before. The concerns of HIPPA and other privacy, although concern to some, could be alleviated if each patient’s information is recorded as a coded number instead of an identifying name, address, or phone number. Patients that need to have their medical records transferred to another medical facility need only give permission to access that specific code. Having a database that is readily accessible would be a huge boon to healthcare.

The authors also talk about data-bases which will improve healthcare in hospitals, doctors’ offices, and in pharmacology because of all the information that would be readily available. Business practices can be streamlined by researching methods that prove to be more cost-effective, efficient, and most responsive to patient needs and welfare.

By eliminating needless treatments, surgeries, and possibly even time needed for recuperation and repeated hospitalization, insurance payments can be controlled and hopefully, the savings will be passed along to the insured. Having a database of medical information that can be utilized easily would only be an advantage, and yes, so long as patient privacy is not violated.

I can only agree that expanding our already expansive use of databases and AI (artificial intelligence) technology would be boon to our healthcare market. We have to get beyond proprietary medical records and put the patient and cost-effective methods first. This is definitely an eye-opening and exciting book and should certainly be taken to heart by anyone in the medical, research, and insurance field.